Exhibitions

Fragments of a Crucifixion

  • McCormick Tribune Gallery
    Second Floor, North Side
    220 E Chicago Ave, Chicago, IL 60611
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Featured images

  • A basketball player leaping toward the hoop as if to dunk looks as if their body is collaged with an image of Jesus Christ wearing a crown of thorns. A large audience looks on.
A basketball player leaping toward the hoop as if to dunk looks as if their body is collaged with an image of Jesus Christ wearing a crown of thorns. A large audience looks on.
Titus Kaphar, Ascension, 2016. Oil on canvas with brass nails; 108 × 84 × 1 ½ in. Collection of Laura Lee Brown and Steve Wilson, 21c Museum Hotels. Image courtesy of the artist.
Ana Mendieta, Untitled from the Silueta series, 1973–77. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, gift from The Howard and Donna Stone Collection. Courtesy of Galerie Lelong, New York. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago, © The Estate of Ana Mendieta Collection.
Paul Pfeiffer, Fragment of a Crucifixion (After Francis Bacon), 1999. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, restricted gift of Kenneth C. Griffin, © Paul Pfeiffer. Courtesy of Paula Cooper Gallery, New York.
Andres Serrano, Untitled (Knifed to Death I and II), 1992. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, restricted gift of Carol and Douglas Cohen, Lynn and Allen Turner, Ruth Horwich, H. Gael Neeson and Stefan T. Edlis, and Gerald S. Elliott by exchange. Courtesy of the artist and Nathalie Obadia gallery. Photo: James Isberner, © MCA Chicago.
Adrian Piper, Imagine [Trayvon Martin] 2013. Digital PNG formatted image; 10.76" x 10.43" (27.33 cm x 26.49), 300 dpi. Available for free download. Collection of the Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin, © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.

Text

Artists have used the crucifixion of Christ as a powerful symbol to address suffering and redemption in the history of racial violence in the United States. Fragments of a Crucifixion explores the continuing relevance of the crucifixion, even as our society becomes increasingly diverse in its religious beliefs. Rather than depict the image of the crucifixion itself, artworks in this exhibition offer only fragments—incomplete images and narratives. These works invoke agony and ecstasy through bodily traces and scenes of absence and loss. Featuring works in the MCA Collection, this show is dedicated to the spiritual in art, and to art’s capacity to evoke life and love in the face of brutality.

The exhibition is organized by Chanon Kenji Praepipatmongkol, Marjorie Susman Curatorial Fellow. It is presented in the McCormick Tribune Orientation Gallery on the museum’s second floor.