On view

Thomas Schütte, Ganz Grosse Geister (Big Spirits XL), 2004

Images of Thomas Schütte, Ganz Grosse Geister (Big Spirits XL)

  • Three yellow sculptures of abstract human figures stand as if communicating with each other outdoors in an urban setting.
Three yellow sculptures of abstract human figures stand as if communicating with each other outdoors in an urban setting.
  1. Long Three yellow and white forms are installed on an outdoor terrace. The forms resemble human bodies, yet they have no faces. The heads of the forms are created from coiled, hard textured material and the bodies are similarly constructed of coiled material, arranged into torsos, arms and legs. The scale of the figures is about double the size of an average person and the are arranged about a half of a figure length apart from each other. The figure on the left appears to have its head tilted to the sky, while the center figure faces to the right, where the third figure bends lightly towards the ground, hand upraised. The bright color of the figures contrasts with urban scene in the background: behind the figures a black fence, green leafy trees and tall gray buildings are visible. The sky is bright blue and the bright light of mid-day casts sharp shadows below the figures.
Thomas Schütte, German, b. 1954
Ganz Grosse Geister (Big Spirits XL), 2004
Enamel on cast aluminum
Three figures, each: 16 ft. high (4.9 m)
Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, The Edlis/Neeson Art Acquisition Fund, 2005.1.a-c
Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago
Thomas Schütte, German, b. 1954
Ganz Grosse Geister (Big Spirits XL), 2004
Enamel on cast aluminum
Three figures, each: 16 ft. high (4.9 m)
Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, The Edlis/Neeson Art Acquisition Fund, 2005.1.a-c
Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago
Thomas Schütte, German, b. 1954
Ganz Grosse Geister (Big Spirits XL), 2004
Enamel on cast aluminum
Three figures, each: 16 ft. high (4.9 m)
Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, The Edlis/Neeson Art Acquisition Fund, 2005.1.a-c
Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago