Edward Krasiński, Interwencja (Intervention), 1983

Images of Edward Krasiński, Interwencja (Intervention)

  • A black box mounted on a black frame contains a rendering of a white box. The entire work is intersected horizontally by a thin blue line.
  • Two black rectangular frames hang on a wall, one on top of the other, the larger has a rectangular opening. A thin blue line bisects both frames horizontally and runs across the wall.
A black box mounted on a black frame contains a rendering of a white box. The entire work is intersected horizontally by a thin blue line.
  1. Long A black box containing an image of a rectangular white box, rendered three-dimensionally, is mounted on the right side of an empty thick black frame. A horizontal blue line, which appears to be a very thin piece of painter's tape, intersects the entire work as well as the white wall behind it.
Edward Krasiński, Polish, 1925 – 2004
Interwencja (Intervention), 1983
Acrylic on wood with blue adhesive tape
Wooden panel: 39 7/16 × 37 7/8 × 5 7/16 in. (100.2 × 96.2 × 13.8 cm); installed dimensions variable
Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Purchased jointly by Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago with funds provided by Mary and Earle Ludgin by exchange and by the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York by Roy R. and Marie S. Neuberger Foundation Inc.; The Cynthia Hazen Polsky Fund., 2014.37
Courtesy of Paulina Krasinska and Foksal Gallery Foundation, Warsaw
Two black rectangular frames hang on a wall, one on top of the other, the larger has a rectangular opening. A thin blue line bisects both frames horizontally and runs across the wall.
  1. Long Two black rectangular frames hang vertically on a white wall. The larger of the two is open in the center, revealing a rectangle of white wall. The smaller black rectangle set off to the right, overlaps the larger one. Painted in its center is a flat, white cuboid shape. A blue line runs horizontally across the center of all of rectangles, continuing along the wall past the edges of the frames. The blue line is perfectly straight, aside from where it intersects the painting of white cuboid: there it follows the sides of the cuboid, giving the illusion of three dimensionality.
Edward Krasiński, Polish, 1925 – 2004
Interwencja (Intervention), 1983
Acrylic on wood with blue adhesive tape
Wooden panel: 39 7/16 × 37 7/8 × 5 7/16 in. (100.2 × 96.2 × 13.8 cm); installed dimensions variable
Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Purchased jointly by Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago with funds provided by Mary and Earle Ludgin by exchange and by the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York by Roy R. and Marie S. Neuberger Foundation Inc.; The Cynthia Hazen Polsky Fund., 2014.37
Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago

About

Edward Krasiński used masking tape to extend the gestures of abstract painting beyond the canvas, thereby challenging the boundary between painting and its supporting walls. Krasiński sourced the royal blue adhesive from the commercial world, inserting a household material into the traditional sphere of high art. His playful imposition literally connects art to the world around it.