Exhibitions

Mika Rottenberg: Easypieces

  • Bergman Family Gallery
    Second Floor, South Side
    220 E Chicago Ave, Chicago, IL 60611
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Featured images

  • In a short animation, light-skinned hands with vivid yellow finger nails repeatedly massage a large mass of mint-green goo.
  • What appears to be a set of rail tracks extends straight ahead of you down a narrow tunnel. Three stark light bulbs extend downward and emit an eerie green glow.
  • An ornately decorated plate holds a hearty serving of green herbs. Atop the herbs, four gray-haired men in suits lay side-by-side.
  • A light-skinned finger ending in a long fingernail extends out from a gray wall. The fingernail is painted black, with details similar to a night sky or galaxy.
  • A woman sits in a room with walls fully covered with colorful inflatable animals and cartoon characters.
  • A woman with disheveled blonde hair and a comically long, pink-tipped nose is seen in front of wooden shelves of flower bouquets.
  • A balding man with thick-framed glasses and a strangely long nose looks directly at you. He sits at a table, upon which two white-and-brown rabbits are resting.
In a short animation, light-skinned hands with vivid yellow finger nails repeatedly massage a large mass of mint-green goo.
Excerpt from Spaghetti Blockchain, 2019. Single-channel video installation, sound, color; approx. 21 min. Courtesy of the artist and Hauser and Wirth.
What appears to be a set of rail tracks extends straight ahead of you down a narrow tunnel. Three stark light bulbs extend downward and emit an eerie green glow.
Mika Rottenberg, Cosmic Generator (still), 2017. © Mika Rottenberg. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth.
An ornately decorated plate holds a hearty serving of green herbs. Atop the herbs, four gray-haired men in suits lay side-by-side.
Mika Rottenberg, Cosmic Generator (still), 2017. © Mika Rottenberg. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth.
A light-skinned finger ending in a long fingernail extends out from a gray wall. The fingernail is painted black, with details similar to a night sky or galaxy.
Mika Rottenberg, Finger 2018. Installation view, Mika Rottenberg, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria, 2018. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: Miro Kuzmanovic.
A woman sits in a room with walls fully covered with colorful inflatable animals and cartoon characters.
Mika Rottenberg, Cosmic Generator (still), 2017. © Mika Rottenberg. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth.
A woman with disheveled blonde hair and a comically long, pink-tipped nose is seen in front of wooden shelves of flower bouquets.
Mika Rottenberg, NoNoseKnows (still), 2015. Video with sound and sculptural installation, 22 min, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth.
A balding man with thick-framed glasses and a strangely long nose looks directly at you. He sits at a table, upon which two white-and-brown rabbits are resting.
Mika Rottenberg, Sneeze (still), 2012. Single-channel video installation, sound, color, dimensions variable; approx. 3 min. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth.

Text

Using absurdist satire to address critical issues of our time, Mika Rottenberg (Argentinian, b. 1976) offers subversive allegories for contemporary life. Her videos and installations interweave documentation with fiction, and often feature protagonists in factory-like settings who manufacture goods ranging from cultured pearls to millions of brightly colored plastic items sold wholesale in Chinese superstores. Presenting several recent projects including Rottenberg’s newest video installation Spaghetti Blockchain (2019), which explores ancient and contemporary ideas about materialism, the exhibition traces central themes in the artist’s oeuvre, such as labor, technology, and the interconnectedness of the mechanical and the bodily.

The exhibition is organized by Margot Norton, curator at the New Museum, New York. The MCA’s presentation of the exhibition has been coorganized by Bana Kattan, Barjeel Global Fellow. It is presented in the Bergman Family Gallery on the museum’s second floor.

Funding

Lead support is provided by the Harris Family Foundation in memory of Bette and Neison Harris: Caryn and King Harris, Katherine Harris, Toni and Ron Paul, Pam Szokol, Linda and Bill Friend, and Stephanie and John Harris; the Margot and W. George Greig Ascendant Artist Fund; Zell Family Foundation; Cari and Michael Sacks; and Julie and Larry Bernstein.