Exhibitions

Chicago Works:Mika Horibuchi

Featured images

  • A vertical painting portrays a close-up view of a light blue, satiny fabric.
  • A muted watercolor painting of two red and green fruits with large leaves.
A vertical painting portrays a close-up view of a light blue, satiny fabric.
  1. Long This hyperrealistic painting captures the variance in light and dark tones in the reflective fabric, which is folded vertically upon itself like a curtain drawn aside. At the bottom of the painting, the fabric stops, with a slightly different texture on its finished ends.
Mika Horibuchi, Curtain Drawn, 2014. Oil on canvas; 60 × 38 × 2 in. (91.4 × 152.4 × 5.1 cm). Courtesy of the artist and PATRON Gallery
Photo: Aron Gent
Mika Horibuchi, RD FB, 2017. Oil on linen; 30 × 24 in. (76.2 × 60.9 cm). Courtesy of the artist and PATRON Gallery
Photo: Mika Horibuchi
Mika Horibuchi, Screen Door, 2015. Oil on linen; 80 × 32 × 2 in. (203.2 × 81.3 × 5.1 cm). Courtesy of the artist and PATRON Gallery
Photo: Brittany Nelson
Mika Horibuchi, Screen/Screen, 2015. Oil on linen and walnut; 37 × 25 × 5 in. (95.3 × 69.9 × 12.7 cm). Courtesy of the artist and PATRON Gallery
Photo: Aron Gent
A muted watercolor painting of two red and green fruits with large leaves.
  1. Long The painting is affixed at its four corners, centered against a larger, roughly textured tan surface. The two fruits are set against a light background, casting mauve shadows against an implied surface. Both the fruits themselves and their leaves share various shades of sage green and pale orange, while the base of the fruits is a more vivid salmon red. At the bottom right corner of the painting appears the date "2017/05/16" in small numerals.
Mika Horibuchi, Watercolor of Persimmons, 2017. Oil on linen; 8 ½ x 11 in. (21.6 × 27.9 cm). Courtesy of the artist and PATRON Gallery
Photo: Aron Gent

About

Chicago-based artist Mika Horibuchi is interested in tricks and slips in visual perception. The curtains, window blinds, and optical illusions she uses as subjects often conceal as much as they reveal. Drawing equally from art history and psychology, she uses techniques such as hyperrealism and trompe l'oeil—in which an image is rendered in detail so true to life that it appears three-dimensional—to walk the line between honesty and deception. In the artist’s words, “A slight betrayal of expectations is at play.”

The exhibition is organized by José Esparza Chong Cuy, Pamela Alper Associate Curator, with Nina Wexelblatt, Curatorial Assistant. It is presented in the Dr. Paul and Dorie Sternberg Family Gallery and Ed and Jackie Rabin Gallery on the museum’s third floor.

Gallery Text

Funding

Generous support for Chicago Works: Mika Horibuchi is provided by the Sandra and Jack Guthman Chicago Works Exhibition Fund.

Donation generously provided by Farrow & Ball.

Installation Images

Installation view, Chicago Works: Mika Horibuchi, MCA Chicago July 17 – December 2, 2018
Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago
Installation view, Chicago Works: Mika Horibuchi, MCA Chicago July 17 – December 2, 2018
Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago
Installation view, Chicago Works: Mika Horibuchi, MCA Chicago July 17 – December 2, 2018
Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago
Installation view, Chicago Works: Mika Horibuchi, MCA Chicago July 17 – December 2, 2018
Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago