Jessica Campbell

  • A scene created out of pieces of carpet portrays a person taking a picture of a portrait in a gallery with a smartphone.
A scene created out of pieces of carpet portrays a person taking a picture of a portrait in a gallery with a smartphone.
  1. Long A person wearing what appears to be a Chicago Cubs jersey, khaki cargo shorts, and grey new balance tennis shoes with white ankle socks is taking a picture with a smartphone of an abstract portrait of President Lincoln with a yellow triangle nose against a salmon pink background flecked with blue triangles. This scene is entirely rendered in plush carpet that lacks detail creating a cartoon-like visual style. The person is standing facing to the right facing the portrait on a white wall. Part of another artwork appears at the left edge of the image in the background, giving the impression of a gallery space. He stands on floorboards of varying shades of brown that extend to the back wall of the space.
Jessica Campbell, Phoning it in, 2018. Acrylic rug on panel; 60 × 48 in. (152.4 × 121.9 cm). Photo: James Prinz, courtesy of Western Exhibitions.
Jessica Campbell, Porn Cabbie, 2018. Acrylic rug and oil on panel; 30 × 40 in. (76.2 × 101.6 cm). Photo: James Prinz, courtesy of Western Exhibitions.
Jessica Campbell, Skinny dip, 2016. Acrylic rug on panel; 60 × 48 in. (152.4 × 121.9 cm). Photo: Robert Chase Heishman and Emily Kay Henson.
Jessica Campbell, The Crack-Up, 2018. Acrylic rug on panel; 36 × 24 in. (91.4 × 61 cm). Photo: James Prinz, courtesy of Western Exhibitions.
Jessica Campbell, Untitled, 2016. Ink and charcoal on paper; 30 × 30 in. (76.2 × 76.2 cm). Photo: Tim Johnson.
Jessica Campbell, Untitled, 2017. Ink and charcoal on paper; 11 × 14 in. (27.9 × 35.6 cm). Photo: Tim Johnson.

About

The satirical drawings, comics, and textiles by Chicago-based artist Jessica Campbell (Canadian, b. 1985) take aim at everyday experiences that reveal the sexism women face in the 21st century. Drawing from a wide range of influences including science fiction, art-world politics, and her Evangelical upbringing, she infuses her work with humor and vulnerability. Her recently published graphic novels include Hot or Not: 20th-Century Male Artists (2016) and XTC69 (2018).

The exhibition is organized by Nina Wexelblatt, Curatorial Assistant. t is presented in the Dr. Paul and Dorie Sternberg Family Gallery and Ed and Jackie Rabin Gallery on the museum’s third floor.