We Are Here

  • Three pairs of shoes sit below three raised black boxes that support six wooden heads. The closest head is hollowed out, others have light-skinned faces emerging from the wood, but the third has a long pointed beak-like form.
  • A sculpture that resembles a silver rabbit-shaped mylar balloon stands on a pedestal. A museum gallery is visible in the sculpture's reflective surface.
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Large jagged letters that read "DESTROYED BY DESIRE" appear over a crude spiral of fluorescent green, yellow, orange, and pink.
Three pairs of shoes sit below three raised black boxes that support six wooden heads. The closest head is hollowed out, others have light-skinned faces emerging from the wood, but the third has a long pointed beak-like form.
Marisol (Marisol Escobar), Six Women, 1965–66. Wood, paint, mirrors, shoes, formica, and plaster; 69 × 105 × 52 in. (175.3 × 266.7 × 132.1 cm). Collection Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, gift of the artist 1968.1. Art © Estate of Marisol Escobar/Licensed by VAGA, New York. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.
A sculpture that resembles a silver rabbit-shaped mylar balloon stands on a pedestal. A museum gallery is visible in the sculpture's reflective surface.
Jeff Koons, Rabbit, 1986. Stainless steel; 41 × 19 × 12 in. (104.1 × 48.3 × 30.5 cm). Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, partial gift of Stefan T. Edlis and H. Gael Neeson, 2000.21. © Jeff Koons. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.
Jonathas de Andrade, The Fish, 2016. 16 mm transferred to 2k, color, and sound; overall dimensions variable. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Gift of Mary and Earle Ludgin by exchange, 2017.3.
Rashid Johnson, Glass Jaw, 2011. Mirrored tile, black soap, wax, books, shea butter, vinyl album cover, BC radio, oyster shells, and paint; 88 ½ × 118 ½ × 12 in. (224.8 × 301 × 30.5 cm). Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Gift of Mary and Earle Ludgin by exchange, 2012.2. Photo: Martin Parsekian.
Xaviera Simmons, On Sculpture #2, 2011. Color photograph, edition 1 of 3; 40 × 50 in. (101.6 × 127 cm), Courtesy of David Castillo Gallery, Miami.
Monir Shahroudy FarmanfarmaianGroup 4 [Convertible Series], 2010. Mirror and reverse glass painting on plaster and wood; overall dimensions variable. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, gift of the artist in honor of Abolbashar Farmanfarmaian, PHD in Political Sciences, University of Chicago, 1952 and Albert A. Robin Estate by exchange, 2016.18. © 2010 Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian . Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.
Huang Yong Ping, Pentagon, 2007. Ceramic, soil, and plants; 19 ¾ × 216 ½ × 216 ½ in. (50 × 550 × 550 cm). Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Joseph and Jory Shapiro Fund 2007.1. © 2007 Huang Yong Ping. Photo: David Regen and Courtesy Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels.
 	

Large jagged letters that read "DESTROYED BY DESIRE" appear over a crude spiral of fluorescent green, yellow, orange, and pink.
Eddie Peake, Destroyed By Desire, 2014. Lacquered spray paint on polished stainless steel 39 7/16 × 55 1/16 in. (100.2 × 139.9 cm). Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, gift of Victor and Daniela Gareh, 2016.10. © 2014 Eddie Peake. Photo © Eddie Peake (Mark Blower).
Andy Warhol, Jackie Frieze, 1964. Silk screen on linen; 20 × 128 × 1 ½ in. (50.8 × 325 × 3.8 cm). Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, gift of Beatrice Cummings Mayer, 2007.32. © 2017 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.

Exhibition dates

I Am You
Aug 19, 2017–Apr 1, 2018
Sylvia Neil and Daniel Fischel Galleries, 2nd floor

You Are Here
Oct 21, 2017–Jan 28, 2018
Griffin Galleries of Contemporary Art, 4th floor

We Are Everywhere
Oct 21, 2017–Jan 28, 2018
Griffin Galleries of Contemporary Art, 4th floor

About

In honor of the MCA’s 50th anniversary, the museum presents We Are Here, a major three-part exhibition drawn from the MCA’s significant collection of twentieth- and twenty-first-century art. The multigenerational artists featured in the exhibition have lived and worked around the world and create works in a broad range of media, including painting, sculpture, installation, sound, film, and video. We Are Here reexamines these works from the vantage point of our present moment, declaring that art and culture have the power to change the way that we see and act in the world.

The exhibition overturns the traditional model of the anniversary exhibition, focusing instead on the relationship between artist and viewer. Museums’ collections and the knowledge and ideas they represent are not static. They are assembled over time, encapsulating the momentary interests of their curators, donors, and publics. The meaning of a work may shift based on a viewer’s perspective or the passage of time. To demonstrate this idea, three of the museum’s curators mined our collection to develop We Are Here in three sections based on themes that resonate with our time and relate to our inner, outer, and social lives.

I Am You, located on the museum’s second floor, gathers works that underscore how each of our unique social and natural landscapes shape a diverse cultural environment. It includes works by recognized artists such as Francis Bacon, Marisol, and Shirin Neshat, as well as younger artists, such as Jonathas de Andrade and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye—all of whom rely upon personal experiences to illuminate the vastness of contemporary life. It presents our interior universe as part of a larger constellation of individuals.

In October, two additional parts of the exhibition, You Are Here and We are Everywhere, open on the museum’s fourth floor. You Are Here examines how the role of the viewer has changed over time, especially since the 1960s, from passive onlooker to active participant. Artists such as Pierre Huyghe and Robert Morris forge a new physical relationship between the viewer and the art object. Other artists, including Huang Yong-Ping, explore representations of political figures and political power—specifically, how the body may be subjected to power.

We Are Everywhere, showcases artists who borrow from popular culture—soup cans, movie stills, neon signage, or floor tiles—to consider the ways that our social lives inflect our perceptions of the world around us. Artists such as Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and Bruce Nauman, as well as Chicago Imagists Karl Wirsum and Roger Brown, re-present and reveal social realities that may otherwise go unnoticed. Artists such as Stan Douglas, Cindy Sherman, Gillian Wearing, Jeff Koons have engaged with new forms of media to extend the reach of their own viewpoints and experiences. Barbara Kruger and Lawrence Abu Hamdan further encourage us to think twice about the power structures in which we invest, be they the notion of the state or the corporation.

Together, these three independently curated yet interrelated "chapters" invite viewers to bring their own perspectives to the museum’s collection and to think about how to be active participants in the meaning of art and its making.

I Am You is organized by José Esparza Chong Cuy, Pamela Alper Associate Curator; You Are Here is organized by Naomi Beckwith, Marilyn and Larry Fields Curator; and We Are Everywhere is organized by Omar Kholeif, Manilow Senior Curator and Director of Global Initiatives, at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago.

Funding

Lead support for We Are Here is provided by the Harris Family Foundation in memory of Bette and Neison Harris: Caryn and King Harris, Katherine Harris, Toni and Ron Paul, Pam and Joe Szokol, Linda and Bill Friend, and Stephanie and John Harris; The Pritzker Traubert Collection; the Nancy Lauter McDougal and Alfred L. McDougal Exhibition Fund; Kenneth C. Griffin; Helen and Sam Zell; and Anne L. Kaplan.

Major support is provided by Nancy and Steve Crown, Kovler Family Foundation, The Bellick Family, Marlene Breslow-Blitstein and Berle Blitstein, Lois and Steve Eisen and The Eisen Family Foundation, and Lannan Foundation.

Generous support is provided by Citi Private Bank, Sara Albrecht, Rebecca W. Knight and Lester B. Knight, The Malkin Family, Carol and John Winzeler, Carol Prins and John Hart/The Jessica Fund, Anne and John Kern, Susan and Lew Manilow, Maria C. Bechily and Scott Hodes, Meta S. and Ronald Berger Family Foundation, Laura De Ferrari and Marshall B. Front, Sylvia Neil and Daniel Fischel, and Here.co.

Special thanks to the Bank of America Art Conservation Project.