Amalia Pica

Images

  • Two theatrical lights on a lightstand are pointed at a wall to create a projection of two overlapping circles, pink on the left, and teal-green on the right
Two theatrical lights on a lightstand are pointed at a wall to create a projection of two overlapping circles, pink on the left, and teal-green on the right
Amalia Pica, Venn diagrams (under the spotlight), 2011. Spotlights on tripod, motion sensors, lighting gels, and graphite on wall, edition 1 of 2, aside from 2 artist’s proofs; installed dimensions variable. Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros. Installation view, Amalia Pica, MCA Chicago, Apr 27–Aug 11, 2013. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.
Amalia Pica, Installation view, 54th Venice Biennale: ILLUMInations, 2011. Photo: Kiki Triantafyllou, courtesy of the artist and Galerie Diana Stigter, Amsterdam.
Amalia Pica, Moon Golem, 2009. Spotlight, mirror, pedestal, framed photograph, and ink-jet print on paper behind glass, edition 1 of 3, aside from 1 artist’s proof; overall dimensions variable. Zabludowicz Collection. Photo: Roger Wooldridge for Hayward Gallery, courtesy of the artist and Galerie Diana Stigter, Amsterdam.
Amalia Pica, Moon Golem, 2009. Spotlight, mirror, pedestal, framed photograph, and ink-jet print on paper behind glass, edition 1 of 3, aside from 1 artist’s proof; overall dimensions variable. Zabludowicz Collection. Photo: Roger Wooldridge for Hayward Gallery, courtesy of the artist and Galerie Diana Stigter, Amsterdam.
Amalia PicaStrangers, 2008. Performance with paper bunting; bunting: 32 13/16 ft. (10 m). Installation view, Artis Den Bosch, 2008. Photo: Gerard Monté, courtesy of the artist and Galerie Diana Stigter, Amsterdam.
Amalia Pica, Endymion’s Journey, 2011. Digital print on canvas, book, and ink on paper; 116 3/8 × 175 3/16 in. (295.6 × 445 cm), overall dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist; Marc Foxx Gallery, Los Angeles; Herald St, London; Johann König, Berlin. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer.
Amalia Pica, Sorry for the Metaphor #2, 2010. Photocopies and wallpaper paste; 132 ¼ x 185 7/8 in. (336 × 472 cm). Collection of Deborah Irmas, Los Angeles. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer, courtesy of the artist; Galerie Diana Stigter, Amsterdam; and Marc Foxx Gallery, Los Angeles.
Amalia Pica, Outside, Inside and Across, 2006/12. Festoon light string; 328 ft. (100 m). Collection of Andrew Ong and George Robertson, New York. Installation view, Amalia Pica, Chisenhale Gallery, 2012. Photo: Mark Blower, courtesy of the artist.
Amalia PicaOn Education, 2008. Super 8 film transferred to DVD (color, sound), edition 1 of 5, aside from 2 artist’s proofs; 4 minutes, 3 seconds. Courtesy of the artist; Herald St, London; Galerie Diana Stigter, Amsterdam; and Marc Foxx Gallery, Los Angeles.
Amalia PicaNostalgia, 2005. Framed telegraphic message and typewriter ink on paper; two parts: 7 7/8 × 11 13/16 in. (20 × 30 cm) and 11 × 8 ½ in. (27.9 × 21.6 cm). Cobra to Contemporary Collection of Hugo and Carla Brown, The Hague. Photo: Tim Bowditch, courtesy of the artist; Herald St, London; and Galerie Diana Stigter, Amsterdam.
Amalia Pica, Installation view, Babble, Blabber, Chatter, Gibber, Jabber, Patter, Prattle, Rattle, Yammer, Yada yada yada, 2010. Slide projection and semaphore flags on pedestal, edition 1 of 3, aside from 1 artist’s proof; overall dimensions variable. Collection of Gregory R. Miller and Michael Weiner, New York. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer, courtesy of the artist; Galerie Diana Stigter, Amsterdam; and Marc Foxx Gallery, Los Angeles.
Amalia Pica, Installation view, Babble, Blabber, Chatter, Gibber, Jabber, Patter, Prattle, Rattle, Yammer, Yada yada yada, 2010. Slide projection and semaphore flags on pedestal, edition 1 of 3, aside from 1 artist’s proof; overall dimensions variable. Collection of Gregory R. Miller and Michael Weiner, New York. Image courtesy of the artist; Galerie Diana Stigter, Amsterdam; and Marc Foxx Gallery, Los Angeles.
Amalia Pica, Post-it Note, 2009–10. Sunlight on paper; 11 13/16 × 8 ¼ in. (30 × 21 cm). Collection of Andrea Succo, Milan. Photo: Sander Tiedema, courtesy of the artist and Galerie Diana Stigter, Amsterdam.
Installation view, Art Basel: Statements, 2012. Photo: Peter Hauk, courtesy of the artist and Galerie Diana Stigter, Amsterdam.

About

Born in Argentina and based in London, artist Amalia Pica explores metaphor, communication, and civic participation through drawings, sculptures, large-scale photographic prints, slide projections, live performances, and installations. The MCA exhibition Amalia Pica is the artist’s first major solo museum show in the United States and includes approximately 15 of her most significant works from the last seven years, in addition to new commissions. Using simple materials such as photocopies, lightbulbs, drinking glasses, beer bottles, bunting, cardboard, and other found materials, Pica creates work that is formally beautiful and conceptually rigorous while addressing fundamental issues of communication—such as the acts of delivering and receiving messages (verbal or nonverbal) and the various forms these exchanges may take. She is particularly interested in the role of the artist in conveying messages to audiences and the translation of thought to action, idea to object. Her work is optimistic in its reflection of moments of shared experience, often incorporating signifiers of celebration and communal gatherings such as fiesta lights, flags and banners, confetti, and rainbows.

Having grown up in Argentina, Pica is attracted to the limits and failures of language and concerned with what it means to have a platform to speak out from. Her work raises questions about individual versus collective speech in the context of extreme political situations, such as those in 1970s Argentina or present-day Afghanistan, and demonstrates how open communication is a right in some regions of the world and a privilege in others.

In addition to new work, the exhibition will include Strangers, an in-gallery performance in which two people who have never met before hold a bunting between them for a specific duration.

This exhibition is co-organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago and MIT List Visual Arts Center. It is cocurated by Julie Rodrigues Widholm, Pamela Alper Associate Curator at MCA Chicago, and João Ribas, Curator at MIT List Visual Arts Center.

Installation Images

Installation view, Amalia Pica, MCA Chicago, Apr 27–Aug 11, 2013. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.
Amalia Pica, Outside, Inside and Across, 2006/12. Festoon light string; 382 ft. (100 m). Collection of Andrew Ong and George Robertson, New York. Installation view, Amalia Pica, MCA Chicago, Apr 27–Aug 11, 2013. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.
Amalia Pica, Eavesdropping (version #2), 2011. Glasses and glue; overall dimensions variable. Collection of James Keith Brown and Eric Diefenbach, New York. Installation view, Amalia Pica, MCA Chicago, Apr 27–Aug 11, 2013. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.
Amalia Pica, Eavesdropping (version #2), 2011. Glasses and glue; overall dimensions variable. Collection of James Keith Brown and Eric Diefenbach, New York. Installation view, Amalia Pica, MCA Chicago, Apr 27–Aug 11, 2013. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.
Amalia Pica, Stabile (with confetti) #2, 2012. Paper and transparent adhesive tape; overall dimensions variable. Collection of Andrew Ong and George Robertson, New York. Installation view, Amalia Pica, MCA Chicago, Apr 27–Aug 11, 2013. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.
Installation view, Amalia Pica, MCA Chicago, Apr 27–Aug 11, 2013. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.
Amalia Pica, Switchboard (pavilion), 2013. Wood, tin cans, screws, paint, glue, and string; 96 × 192 × 192 in. (243.8 × 487.7 × 487.7 cm). Courtesy of the artist and Marc Foxx Gallery, Los Angeles. Installation view, Amalia Pica, MCA Chicago, Apr 27–Aug 11, 2013. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.
Amalia Pica, Switchboard (pavilion), 2013. Wood, tin cans, screws, paint, glue, and string; 96 × 192 × 192 in. (243.8 × 487.7 × 487.7 cm). Courtesy of the artist and Marc Foxx Gallery, Los Angeles. Installation view, Amalia Pica, MCA Chicago, Apr 27–Aug 11, 2013. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.
Amalia Pica, Catachresis #9 (legs of the table, the neck of the bottle, the elbow of the pipe, the leg of the chair), 2011. Table legs, bottle, pipe, and chair leg; 51 ¼ x 12 × 9 ½ in. (130 × 30.5 × 24 cm). Private collection, San Francisco. Installation view, Amalia Pica, MCA Chicago, Apr 27–Aug 11, 2013. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.
Amalia Pica, Catachresis #35 (legs of chair, teeth of the rake, eye of the potato, eye of the needle), 2013. Chair legs, rake, potato, and needle; 45 ¼ x 28 × 26 in. (115 × 71 × 66 cm). Courtesy of the artist. Installation view, Amalia Pica, MCA Chicago, Apr 27–Aug 11, 2013. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.
Amalia Pica, Moon Golem, 2009. Spotlight, mirror, pedestal, framed photograph and ink-jet print on paper behind glass, edition 1 of 3, aside from 1 artist’s proof; installed dimensions variable. Zabludowicz Collection. Installation view, Amalia Pica, MCA Chicago, Apr 27–Aug 11, 2013. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.
Amalia Pica, Strangers, 2008. Performance with paper bunting; bunting: 32 13/16 ft. (10 m). Courtesy of the artist. Installation view, Amalia Pica, MCA Chicago, Apr 27–Aug 11, 2013. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.
Amalia Pica, Endymion’s Journey, 2011. Digital print on canvas, book, and ink on paper; digital print: 116 3/8 × 175 3/16 in. (295.6 × 445 cm), installed dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist; Marc Foxx Gallery, Los Angeles; Herald St, London; and Johann König, Berlin. Installation view, Amalia Pica, MCA Chicago, Apr 27–Aug 11, 2013. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.

Funding

Support for Amalia Pica is generously provided by the Margot and W. George Greig Ascendant Artist Fund. Additional generous support is provided by the Chauncey and Marion D. McCormick Family Foundation; Mary Ittelson; Nancy Lauter McDougal and Alfred L. McDougal; Ashlee and Martin Modahl; James Keith Brown and Eric Diefenbach; Larry Mathews and Brian Saliman; Marc Foxx and Rodney Hill, Marc Foxx Gallery, Los Angeles; the Consulate General of Argentina in Chicago; Phillips; Galerie Diana Stigter, Amsterdam; and Herald St, London.

MCA Chicago is a proud member of Museums in the Park and receives major support from the Chicago Park District.

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